Escambia County Sheriff

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Sheriffs of Escambia County
Name Tenure
Henri Peire 1821
Charles Bradford 1821 - 1822
William Davison 1823 - 1826
Charles Mifflin 1827
Henry Wilson 1828
Adam Gordon 1829
James Pendleton 1829 - 1830
Florencio Commyns 1830 - 1837
Jesse Allen 1837 - 1840
Peter Woodbine 1840 - 1842
Ebenezer Dorr IV 1842 - 1846
Mortimar Bright 1846
Angus Nicholson 1846 - 1847
Antoine Collins 1847 - 1851
Francis de la Rua 1851 - 1852
Francis Maura 1852 - 1854
Joseph Crosby 1854 - 1857
William Jordan 1857 - 1859
Daniel Williams 1859 - 1865
James B. Roberts 1865 - 1868
George Wentworth 1868 - 1870
Henry Campbell 1870
E. R. Payne 1870
George Wells 1870 - 1874
J. N. Coombs 1874 - 1875
A. M. Green 1875 - 1877
W. H. Hutchison 1877 - 1885
Joseph Wilkins 1885 - 1893
George E. Smith 1893 - 1903
James C. Van Pelt 1903 - 1913
A. Cary Ellis 1913 - 1917
James C. Van Pelt 1917 - 1919
Hurdis S. Whitaker 1919 - 1921
A. Cary Ellis 1921 - 1923
Mose S. Penton 1923 - 1932
H. E. Gandy 1932 - 1941
Howard L. Mayes 1941 - 1945
R. L. Kendrick 1945 - 1957
Emmett Shelby 1957 - 1961
Bill Davis 1961 - 1970
Royal Untreiner 1970 - 1981
Joseph "Vince" Seely 1981 - 1989
Charlie Johnson 1989 - 1993
Jim Lowman 1993 - 2001
Ron McNesby 2001 - 2009
David Morgan 2009 - present

The Escambia County Sheriff is the chief law enforcement official of Escambia County, which was established with the transfer from Spain in 1821, and the head of the Escambia County Sheriff's Office. The current sheriff is David Morgan.

History[edit]

Henri Peire, a former privateer and colonel in the United States army, was named the first sheriff (then called "alguazil") by General Andrew Jackson.[1]

Duties[edit]

The county sheriff is a Florida consitutional officer and a part of the state judicial branch, and its duties as enumerated in Chapter 30 of the Florida Statutes include:[2]

  • Executing all process of the Supreme Court, circuit court, county court, and board of county commissioners, to be executed in its county.
  • Executing such other writs, processes, warrants, and other papers directed to it, as may come to its hands to be executed in its county.
  • Attending all terms of the circuit court and county court held in its county.
  • Executing all orders of the board of county commissioners of its county, for which services it shall receive such compensation, out of the county treasury, as said boards may deem proper.
  • Being conservator of the peace in its county.
  • Suppressing tumults, riots, and unlawful assemblies in its county with force and strong hand when necessary.
  • Apprehending, without warrant, any person disturbing the peace, and carrying that person before the proper judicial officer, that further proceedings may be had against him or her according to law.
  • Having authority to raise the power of the county and command any person to assist it, when necessary, in the execution of the duties of its office; and, whoever, not being physically incompetent, refuses or neglects to render such assistance, shall be punished by imprisonment in jail not exceeding 1 year, or by fine not exceeding $500.
  • Being, ex officio, timber agents for its county.
  • Performing such other duties as may be imposed upon it by law.

Election[edit]

Sheriffs are elected to four-year terms in partisan elections.

Budget[edit]

http://escambiaso.com/purchasingbids/CountyComparison.pdf

Administration[edit]

Main article: Escambia County Sheriff's Office


The Sheriff’s Office Administration Division is responsible for maintaining the day to day operations. This division includes vital units such as Communications, Information Technology, Human Resources, Finance, Training, Domestic Security and other essential support services. For more information concerning current purchasing bids,

External links[edit]

Official site

References[edit]

  • John Appleyard. The Peacekeepers: the Story of Escambia County, Florida's 43 Sheriffs. 2007.
  1. Other records show a man named William Loftin, a resident of the Oyster Bay/St. Andrews area (modern day Panama City) as being appointed sheriff of "Florida's Western District," another designation for the territory west of the [[Wikipedia:Suwanee River|]].
  2. Florida Statutes